Books We Love

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  • Living in Spanglish: The Search for Latino Identity in America
    by Ed Morales

    In this book, Morales pins down a hugely diverse community-of Dominicans, Mexicans, Colombians, Cubans, Salvadorans and Puerto Ricans–that he insists has more common interests to bring it together than traditions to divide it. He calls this sensibility Spanglish, one that is inherently multicultural, and proposes that Spanglish “describes a feeling, an attitude that is quintessentially American. It is a culture with one foot in the medieval and the other in the next century.”

  • Pardon My Spanglish
    by Bill Santiago

    In Pardon My Spanglish, stand-up comedian Bill Santiago chronicles the quintessentially American alegrías of his mother tongue: the quirky, hilariously improvisational fusion of inglés and español spoken by millions (even if they don’t know or admit que están doing it). With crash-course efficiency, cada página de este libro empowers your every step toward Spanglish mastery. How can you not love Spanglish? Twice the vocabulary, half the grammar!

  • Spanglish: The Making of a New American Language
    by Ilan Stavans

    With the release of the census figures in 2000, Latino America was anointed the future driving force of American culture. The emergence of Spanglish as a form of communication is one of the more influential markers of an America gone Latino. Spanish, present on this continent since the fifteenth century, when Iberian explorers sought to colonize territories in what are now Florida, New Mexico, Texas, and California, has become ubiquitous in the last few decades. The nation’s unofficial second language, it is highly visible on several 24-hour TV networks and on more than 200 radio stations across the country.